Christina Eilman
Christina Eilman

Chicago Police Face Lawsuit for Dumping White Women in Violent Black Neighborhood

Compiled by Lewis Loflin


Update January 14, 2013 Chicago Sun Times:

"Chicago taxpayers will spend $22.5 million to compensate a mentally-ill California (white) woman who was arrested (on minor charges) and held overnight, then released in a high-crime (black) neighborhood, where she was kidnapped and sexually assaulted (raped by feral black males) before falling (being thrown) from a seventh-floor window of a CHA high-rise. The settlement to Christina Eilman, now 27, is one of the largest to a single plaintiff in Chicago history..."

A federal appeals court in Chicago has ruled a California woman who survived being kidnapped, raped, and thrown from a seven-story window can proceed with her lawsuit against the Chicago Police Department. Christina Eilman, then 21, was arrested in May 2006, accused of causing a disturbance at Midway International Airport. Police dumped her in a violent black neighborhood without her cell phone.

Judge Easterbrook suggested the police showed complete disregard for the danger white people face when they dumped the petite, blond Eilman in a violent minority community. To quote,

"She was lost, unable to appreciate her danger, and dressed in a manner to attract attention, she is white and well off while the local population is predominantly black and not affluent, causing her to stand out as a person unfamiliar with the environment and thus a potential target for crime."

Eilman was abducted and sexually assaulted and then jumped (likely pushed/thrown) from a seventh-floor window of a public housing building. She suffered horrific brain damage leaving her with the mind of a child. Judge Frank Easterbrook also wrote that police "might as well have released her into the lions' den at the Brookfield Zoo." These statements brought outrage from the political correctness police.

Feral black male Marvin Powell was convicted of kidnapping Eilman and "restraining her in the apartment." Police said Eilman had been sexually assaulted, but Powell was not convicted of that crime or for pushing her out the window. There were others present that may have been involved. They testified they were trying to help the victim. Powell is now on parol.

While it's true according to Attorney General Holder white people in general are not protected by hate crime laws, the mentally ill are. So why didn't they at least go for those charges? The victim was white, the thug black as usual, and that was that. In one case a redneck assaulted a black man who suffered no serious injuries got 10 years in prison for a "hate crime." What am I missing here?

The animal that attacked this women is out on parol while the family is still trying to get their day in court. Any fool should have known a white women released into a violent black neighborhood was going to be attacked. But we can't say such a thing can we?

In fairness most black people are not animals and there's many cases where they try to help white victims. (Or anyone else for that matter.) But the constant left-wing hysteria on anything they can connect to white racism while covering up or playing down the everyday violent attacks on white people does nobody any good.

This refusal to deal with young feral blacks sadly creates loathing for the entire community. It's not fair, but facts are not racism either. In the end black people suffer the most, and most whites are fed up with this problem. If the press can't present the facts, then bloggers will do it for them.

What is below is directly from legal documents.

Case: 10-1487 Filed: 04/26/2012
In the United States Court of Appeals For the Seventh Circuit

Police arrested Christina Eilman on May 7, 2006, outside Chicago's Midway Airport. Eilman had arrived from California, her home state, on May 5, and on May 6 she tried to return. When a ticket agent at Frontier Airlines told Eilman that she lacked a reservation, Eilman threw a tantrum and was escorted from the airport. On May 7 she purchased a ticket from Southwest Airlines but behaved so oddly while waiting to board the airplane that agents called the police, who again escorted her from the airport.

Eilman walked to the rail and bus terminal of the Chicago Transit Authority, immediately outside the airport, where she started singing loudly, ranting about the price of oil, and screaming at other persons with her face only inches from theirs. She would not or could not stop, despite multiple requests, leading to her arrest. Eilman, 21 and in college, had been in an auto accident the previous year. She recovered physically but developed bipolar disorder, spending 37 days in a mental hospital.

(Whether the accident caused the bipolar disorder or just aggravated an existing condition is not important.) Eilman failed to take prescribed psychotropic medicines and had relapses. Experts in this litigation concluded that, during May 5 to 8, 2006, Eilman was in an acute manic phase. She did not tell the police about her mental-health background, however, and was uncooperative after her arrest--sometimes refusing to answer questions, sometimes screaming, sometimes providing false or unresponsive answers.

Phone calls from her mother and her stepfather told officers in Chicago that Eilman had bipolar disorder, but the officers did not believe the stepfather (they thought that the call was fake), and the officer who took the calls from Kathleen Paine, Eilman's mother, failed to tell anyone else or record the information in Eilman's file.

While Eilman was in custody, some officers thought that she was just being difficult, some thought that she was on drugs (expert reports relate that methamphetamine could cause similar symptoms), some thought that she was no worse than the run of loud and uncooperative people who don't want to be in custody, and those who thought that she needed mentalhealth care were ignored or overruled.

Police took Eilman from Midway Airport to the Eighth District station, at 3515 West 63rd Street, 2.6 miles from the airport by road (as are the other distances in this opinion). She was in custody from midafternoon of May 7 until that evening, when Lt. Earnest, the watch commander, decided that Eilman would be charged and held until she qualified for release on bond. That decision led to Eilman's transfer to the Second District station at 5101 South Wentworth Avenue, about 5.7 miles from the Eighth District station (and 7.3 miles from the airport). The Second District has a holding facility for women; the Eighth District does not.

While at the Second District, Eilman alternated between calm and manic conduct, sometimes chatting amiably while sometimes screaming, chanting rap lyrics, smearing menstrual blood on the cell's walls, and taking off her clothes. Officers processed the paperwork to release her on an individual-recognizance bond. Eilman signed the bond at about 6:30 PM on May 8 and walked out of the stationhouse. She had no idea where she was and did not do the most sensible things--hail a taxi or head for a CTA station (three were nearby) and get out of the area during the remaining daylight. (Sunset that day was 7:57 PM .)

It was evening; the police station was close to the Robert Taylor Homes, a public-housing project with an exceptionally high crime rate; the police had not returned her cell phone, so she could not easily summon aid; she was lost, unable to appreciate her danger, and dressed in a manner that attracted attention (a cutoff top with a bare midriff, short shorts, and boots); and she is white and well off while the local population is predominantly black and not affluent, causing her to stand out as a person unfamiliar with the environment and thus a potential target for crime. (Here is where the PC police went crazy.)

Officer Pauline Heard saw Eilman standing, with a puzzled look, in the stationhouse's parking lot. Heard pointed toward 51st Street. Eilman began walking but did not leave the neighborhood. She stopped in the J & J Fish Restaurant at 5401 South Wentworth. The restaurant's staff and customers have related that she was babbling and acting strangely.

Eilman left the restaurant, walked two blocks north (and one block east), and joined a cluster of 15 to 20 people on a street corner outside 5135 South Federal Street, one of the project's high-rise buildings. She accompanied several young men to Apartment 702, which was vacant and had been taken over as a hangout.

Some of the occupants told her that it was unsafe and that she should leave, but Eilman was too confused to act on that advice. One man nonetheless led her to his grandmother's house, but when Eilman said that she needed a place to sleep for the night she was returned to Apartment 702. About five hours after the police let Eilman go, Marvin Powell found her there, forced others out, and raped her at knifepoint. People outside tried and failed to break down the door in time to save Eilman.

Trying to escape, Eilman jumped out the window, which was seven stories above ground. She may have been pushed or thrown out but cannot tell us what happened, because although she survived the fall her brain was seriously damaged. She has undergone years of physical therapy, but her brain functioning is permanently that of a child.

The district court rejected the defendants' claim of immunity because, in the judge's view, detainees' right to medical care is clearly established--and because a reasonable jury could find that Eilman needed care, and the police knew it.

 



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